Brain Injury

All brain injuries are different and people may be affected to a varying degree by any number of these problems depending on the severity of their injury and the area of the brain which is affected.

What is brain injury?

  • A stroke
  • A brain tumour
  • Encephalitis/meningitis
  • A blow to the head in an accident, an assault, a sports injury or something as simple as slipping and banging your head.
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What different types of brain injuries are there?

All brain injuries are different and people may be affected to a varying degree by any number of these problems depending on the severity of their injury and the area of the brain which is affected.

The main effects of brain injury can be grouped into three areas:

  • Physical – affecting how the body works
  • Cognitive – affecting how the person thinks, learns and remembers
  • Executive – affecting the ability to decision make, plan and organise
  • Psychosocial – affecting how the person feels and acts

Resources

www.headwayguernsey.org.gg
www.headway.org.uk
‘Head Injury – A practical guide’ by Trevor Powell
Brain Injury booklets available from Headway Guernsey
Headway Guernsey – 01481 252589

What are the long-term effects of a brain injury?

If you suffer from a brain injury it can affect you in many ways; changes in personality, difficulty concentrating, problems with speech, fatigue, visual and other sensory impairment, memory, epilepsy and restricted mobility.

Top Tips

Top Tips for the community interacting with someone with a brain injury.

  • Listen and allow the individual the time to talk. It may take some time for the individual to articulate themselves and get their message across but they will appreciate your patience.
  • One talker at a time. Reduce background noise if possible.
  • Don’t rush. The individual may have difficulty processing language quickly enough and be unable to understand a lot of information at one time.
  • Speak Clearly. Language difficulties can provide a disabling barrier. Communication difficulties does not reflect the social competence and intelligence of a brain injury survivor.

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